Mark English Architecture

Mark English Architecture

About This Blog

I've been involved in Architectural Design and Structural Engineering on a freelance basis since 1999. I've accumulated a vast amount of experience over the last 20 years working on projects for both domestic and commercial clients such as Fidus, Siemens, Laing O'Rourke, BMW Group and Northumbrian Water.

If you hace a particular query that is not yet addressed on this Blog then feel free to email me.

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Thanks for reading...

What is it? - Party Wall

Party Wall ActPosted by Mark English Architecture Thu, June 20, 2013 20:08:45
The Party Wall is normally a dividing wall or fence that is constructed on the boundary line generally between 2 properties. To work on the Party Wall for maintenance or say installing steelwork for a domestic loft conversion you WILL NEED to issue notice and gain approval from your neighbours prior to doing anything! Normally the notice period in 30 days.

A building owner proposing to start work covered by the Act must give adjoining owners notice of their intentions in the way set down in the Act. Adjoining owners can agree or disagree with what is proposed. Where they disagree, the Act provides a mechanism for resolving disputes.

The Party Wall Act is separate from obtaining planning permission or building regulations approval.

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Changes to The Party Wall Act

Party Wall ActPosted by Mark English Architecture Thu, June 20, 2013 19:58:58

Today it has been announced that there's amendments to the Party Wall Act...
The Party Wall Act provides a framework for preventing and resolving disputes in relation to party walls, boundary walls and excavations near neighbouring buildings.

List_of_Changes

I normally provide clients with Party Wall Agreements to cover the following:

  • 1. new building on or at the boundary of 2 properties
  • 2. work to an existing party wall or party structure
  • 3. excavation near to and below the foundation level of neighbouring buildings

This may include:

  • A. building a new wall on or at the boundary of 2 properties
  • B. cutting into a party wall
  • C. making a party wall taller, shorter or deeper
  • D. removing chimney breasts from a party wall
  • E. knocking down and rebuilding a party wall
  • F. digging below the foundation level of a neighbour’s property

Anyway, check out the Explanatory_Booklet_PDF or just contact me for some free informal advice... I'll be happy to help smiley

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